My Blog
By Green Bay Family Dental
January 20, 2022
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: celebrity smiles   crown  
WhatChrissyTeigensInaugurationNightCapMishapCouldMeanForYou

Inauguration night is usually a lavish, Washington, D.C., affair with hundreds attending inaugural balls throughout the city. And when you're an A-List celebrity whose husband is a headliner at one of the events, it's sure to be a memorable night. As it was for super model Chrissy Teigen—but for a slightly different reason. During the festivities in January, Teigen lost a tooth.

Actually, it was a crown, but once she told a Twitter follower that she loved it “like he was a real tooth.” The incident happened while she was snacking on a Fruit Roll-Up (those sticky devils!), and for a while there, husband and performer John Legend had to yield center stage to the forlorn cap.

But here's something to consider: If not for the roll-up (and Teigen's tweets on the accident) all of us except Teigen, her dentist and her inner circle, would never have known she had a capped tooth. That's because today's porcelain crowns are altogether life-like. You don't have to sacrifice appearance to protect a tooth, especially one that's visible when you smile (in the “Smile Zone”).

It wasn't always like that. Although there have been tooth-colored materials for decades, they weren't as durable as the crown of choice for most of the 20th Century, one made of metal. But while gold or silver crowns held up well against the daily grind of biting forces, their metallic appearance was anything but tooth-like.

Later, dentists developed a hybrid of sorts—a metal crown fused within a tooth-colored porcelain shell. These PFM (porcelain-fused-to-metal) crowns offered both strength and a life-like appearance. They were so effective on both counts that PFMs were the most widely used crowns by dentists until the early 2000s.

But PFMs today make up only 40% of currently placed crowns, down from a high of 83% in 2005. What dethroned them? The all-ceramic porcelain crown—but composed of different materials from years past. Today's all-ceramic crowns are made of more durable materials like lithium disilicate or zirconium oxide (the strongest known porcelain) that make them nearly as strong as metal or PFM crowns.

What's more, coupled with advanced techniques to produce them, all-ceramic crowns are incredibly life-like. You may still need a traditional crown on a back tooth where biting forces are much higher and visibility isn't an issue. But for a tooth in the “Smile Zone”, an all-ceramic crown is more than suitable.

If you need a new crown (hopefully not by way of a sticky snack) or you want to upgrade your existing dental work, see us for a complete exam. A modern all-ceramic crown can protect your tooth and enhance your smile.

If you would like more information about crowns or other kinds of dental work, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Porcelain Crowns & Veneers.”

By Green Bay Family Dental
January 10, 2022
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   osteoporosis  
SomeOsteoporosisTreatmentsCouldImpactDentalCare

Millions of Americans live with osteoporosis, a degenerative bone disease that can turn a minor fall into a potential bone fracture. Literally meaning "porous bone," osteoporosis causes the natural marrow spaces in bone tissue to progressively grow larger and weaken the remaining bone.

Many osteoporosis patients take medication to slow the disease's process. But due to the dynamic nature of bone, some of these drugs can have unintended consequences—consequences that could affect dental care.

As living tissue, bone is literally "coming and going." Certain cells called osteoblasts continuously produce new bone, while others called osteoclasts remove older tissue to make way for the new. Drugs like bisphosphonates and RANKL inhibitors interrupt this process by destroying some of the osteoclasts.

As a result, more of the older bone remains past its normal lifespan, helping the bone overall to retain strength. But ongoing research is beginning to hint that this may only be a short-term gain. The older, longer lasting bone is more fragile than newer bone, and tends to become more brittle and prone to fracture the longer a patient takes the drug. This tissue can also die but still remain intact, a condition known as osteonecrosis.

The femur (the large upper leg bone) and the jawbone are the bones of the body most susceptible to osteonecrosis. Dentists are most concerned when this happens in the latter: Its occurrence could lead to complications during invasive procedures like oral surgery or implant placement.

Because of this possibility, you should keep your dentist informed regarding any treatments you're undergoing for osteoporosis, especially when planning upcoming dental procedures like oral surgery or implant placement. You might be able to lower your risk by taking a "drug holiday," coming off of certain medications for about three months before your dental work.

As always, you shouldn't stop medication without your doctor's guidance. But research has shown drug holidays of short duration won't worsen your osteoporosis. If you're already showing signs of osteonecrosis in the jaw, a short absence from your prescription along with antiseptic mouthrinses and heightened oral hygiene could help reverse it.

Fortunately, the risk for dental complications related to osteoporosis medication remains low. And, by working closely with both your dentist and your physician, you can ensure it stays that way.

If you would like more information on osteoporosis and your dental care, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Osteoporosis Drugs & Dental Treatment.”

By Green Bay Family Dental
December 31, 2021
Category: Oral Health
DontWaittoHaveYourChildsMouthBreathingCheckedandTreated

It's normal for your child to breathe through their mouth if they're winded from play, or if they have a stuffy nose from an occasional cold. But what if they're doing it all the time, even at rest? That could be a problem for their overall health—and their oral health as well.

Although we can breathe through both the nose and the mouth, our bodies naturally prefer the former. The nasal passages filter out allergens and other harmful particles, as well as warm and humidify incoming air. Nose breathing also helps generate nitric oxide, a highly beneficial molecule to physical health.

We switch to mouth breathing when we're not receiving sufficient air through the nose. For chronic mouth breathers, something has obstructed or restricted the nasal passages like allergies or enlarged tonsils or adenoids.

Mouth breathing especially can affect a child's oral health because of the relationship between the tongue and jaw development. During nose breathing, the tongue rests against the roof of the mouth (palate), where it serves as a kind of mold around which the growing upper jaw can develop.

When breathing through the mouth, however, the tongue falls against the back of the bottom teeth. If this becomes chronic, the jaw may develop too narrowly, depriving the incoming teeth of enough room to erupt and leading to a poor bite.

If you notice things like your child's mouth falling open while at rest, snoring, irritability or problems with concentration (associated with poor sleep due to blocked nasal passages), then consider having a doctor examine them for a possible nasal obstruction. You should also check with your dentist to see if your child's jaw development has been affected. If caught early, there are interventional measures that could get it back on track.

Even after correction of a nasal obstruction, a child may still find it difficult to readapt to nose breathing because of a "muscle memory" for breathing through the mouth. In that case, they may need orofacial therapy to retrain their muscles for nose breathing.

It's important to stay aware of any signs of chronic mouth breathing with your child. Diagnosing and treating the condition early could help them avoid other problems later in life.

If you would like more information on the effects of mouth breathing on jaw development, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Trouble With Mouth Breathing.”

By Green Bay Family Dental
December 23, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures

Care through a practice offering pediatric dentistry in Green Bay, WI, should start around a child’s first birthday. Some children display fear of the dental office before or during that first visit while others may develop fear later after an intense dental procedure. Regardless of the reason or time of onset for dental fear or phobia, Dr. Heidi Eggers-Ulve and Dr. Eric Ulve are prepared to help all children work through the fear to a place of comfort at Green Bay Family Dental.

It’s often easier to prevent fear in children than to overcome it after it has set in, so we want to share a few dental fear prevention tips. These tips aren’t guaranteed to stop a child from feeling afraid at the dentist, but they will help.

Don’t Skip Early Dental Visits

Start with the one-year visit, and then go on schedule as recommended by your dentist. Prioritize dental appointments for the whole family. That allows your child to enjoy pleasurable experiences early in life and makes dental visits a normal occurrence or life routine.

What if a child starts to show signs of dental fear prior to the first visit? You can read books related to the dentist and talk about your own experiences with your child. Make it an exciting adventure or reward for getting “big enough” to see the dentist.

Aim for Consistency at the Office

Allow your children to get familiar with the staff, dentists, office setting, and procedure at a dental office offering pediatric dentistry in Green Bay, WI. Then stick with that location as long as possible. Fear is often the result of uncertainty or not knowing what to expect. It only makes sense to introduce the dentist and then keep everything predictable.

Aim for Consistency at Home, Too

Dental care at home should become a daily routine that gets your child accustomed to touching and cleaning their teeth and gums. Young children can “help” brush their teeth before they even have teeth. Open the bathroom door and allow them to at least see other members of the family taking care of their dental needs.

Consult with Your Dentist Before Major Procedures

If your child must go through a procedure beyond basic cleaning and x-rays, work with your dentist to set expectations on the child’s level of comprehension. Manage pain effectively. Don’t allow a long gap between the procedure and a more pleasant dental office experience.

Do you have a child ready for pediatric dentistry in Green Bay, WI? If so, contact Dr. Eggers-Ulve and Dr. Ulve at Green Bay Family Dental. Call (921) 432-2961 to schedule an appointment or discuss ways to overcome your child’s fear of the dentist.

By Green Bay Family Dental
December 21, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
DoYouHaveEnoughSupportingBoneforanImplant

Upgrades can be exciting—moving on to a larger house, the latest smartphone, or maybe a new car. And, the same can apply with tooth replacements: Maybe you're ready now to upgrade your existing restoration to a dental implant, the most advanced tooth replacement method now available.

But you might encounter a speed bump in your plans: whether or not you have enough bone available for an implant. Here's why your bone may not be adequate.

Like any other cellular tissue, bone has a life cycle: older cells die and newer cells form to take their place. This process stays on track because of the forces generated when we chew, which stimulates new growth.

But that stimulus disappears when a tooth goes missing. This slows the bone growth cycle to the point that bone volume can gradually dwindle. You could in fact lose up to a quarter of bone width in just the first year after losing a tooth.

And, you'll need adequate bone to provide your implants with sufficient strength and stability, as well as the best possible appearance alongside your other teeth. If you don't have enough bone, we must either enhance its current volume or opt for a different restoration.

Fortunately, we may be able to do the former through bone augmentation or grafting. With this method, we place a graft of bone tissue in the area we wish to regenerate. The graft becomes a scaffold upon which new bone cells build upon. It's possible for grafting to produce up to 5 mm in additional width and 3 mm in height to supporting bone.

We can also use this method to prevent bone loss by placing a graft immediately following a tooth extraction. Some studies show the graft can help preserve bone up to 10 years, giving patients time to consider or prepare for a dental implant.

 There are circumstances, though, where bone loss has been too extensive to make up enough ground to place an implant. If so, there are other effective and life-like restorations to replace missing teeth. But there's still a good chance augmentation can restore the bone you need for a new smile with dental implants.

If you would like more information on dental implant restorations, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants After Previous Tooth Loss.”





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